Rub shoulders with (someone)

Do you know the English expression “to rub shoulders with (someone)“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Takeshi: How was the Christmas party at work?

Akiko: It was good. We got to rub shoulders with all the directors.

Does it mean:

a) touch someone’s shoulders

b) come into contact with someone

c) stand next to someone

d) give someone a shoulder massage

The answer is below! ↓

close up of two flute glasses filled with sparkling wine wuth ribbons and christmas decor

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b) come into contact with someone

Up and running

Do you know the English expression “to be up and running“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Natalie: Have you set up your new computer system at work?

Michelle: Yes, it is all up and running.

Does it mean:

a) to be running fast

b) to be high up

c) to be working

d) to be broken

The answer is below!↓

women using laptop

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Answer: c) to be working

Ways to say “big”

Look at the words below. Three of the words mean “big”. One word doesn’t mean “big”. Which word doesn’t mean “big”?

a) massive

b) enormous

c) gigantic

d) minuscule

The answer is below!↓

question mark on yellow background

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Answer: d) minuscule

Minuscule means “very small”

Pass out

Do you know the English expression “to pass out“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Rob: It’s too hot to hold the sports competition today. People will be passing out because of the heat.

Claire: I know. A few people passed out just walking down the road!

Does it mean:

a) faint

b) die

c) run

d) lie down

The answer is below!↓

brown and green grass field during sunset

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Answer: a) faint

[Easy English Blog] Murphy’s Law

Today’s Easy English Blog is from Patricia in New Zealand!

person holding a chalk in front of the chalk board

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When you studied science in school, you learned some laws.

F= ma

P1V1 = P2V2

e=mc2

 These were very useful for passing science tests.

 But people say there are laws in our daily lives as well. I think some of these are very funny.

Murphy’s Law says – “if anything can go wrong – it will.”

There are many different ways of saying Murphy’s Law. One version that I like, is this one…

If you are eating toast with jam on it, and you drop the toast on the floor, it will always land with the jam side downwards —

 Do you agree?

[Easy English Blog] Multi-tasking

Today’s Easy English Blog is from Patricia in New Zealand!

man in white jersey shirt and pants holding cricket bat

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Do you know the expression – multi-tasking? It means to try to do more than one thing at the same time.

I am multi-tasking at the moment.

I am watching a cricket match on TV, I am cooking chicken to make a chicken and mushroom pie for dinner and I am writing this blog/message.

The TV is in the living room.  My computer is in the office. So I am walking a lot.

I have the volume on the TV up/loud.  Every time I hear some shouting or clapping or cheering, I run to the living room to see what is happening with the cricket match. Every two minutes or so, I go into the kitchen to check the chicken.  Then I sit down at the computer and type a few more words. I am spending half my time walking or running. This is not efficient!

Sometimes when I multi-task, I think I am efficient.  I watch TV while I iron clothes. I watch TV and sew.  Some people ride an exercise bike and watch TV – this is efficient. Get fit and watch your favourite programmes at the same time!

Maybe the best multi-tasking is to do one thing that needs your brain and another thing that uses your body but doesn’t need your brain.

Sorry! Time to go. There is a lot of noise from the cricket and I must check the chicken!

Slack off

Do you know the English expression “to slack off“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Dave: How is the new guy at work?

Lisa: Not very good. He’s always slacking off when we are really busy.

Does it mean:

a) not do one’s work

b) take a nap

c) go somewhere else

d) complain

The answer is below!↓

man welding iron

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Answer: a) not do one’s work