Get your skates on!

Do you know the English expression “get your skates on“? It is used in the UK, and it is an informal expression. Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Belinda: Aren’t you ready yet? Get your skates on, or we will be late!

Paul: I’ll be ready in five minutes!

Does it mean:

a) put your skating boots on

b) hurry up

c) stop getting ready

d) leave the house now

The answer is below!↓

red vintage shoes sport

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Answer: b) hurry up

Take pity on (someone)

Do you know the English expression “to take pity on (someone)“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Barbara: How is your husband? Has he found a new job yet?

Julie: Yes, his cousin took pity on him and offered him a job with her company.

Does it mean:

a) envy someone

b) feel sorry for someone and try to help them

c) feel sorry for someone and cause them trouble

d) say kind words

The answer is below!↓

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard

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Answer: b) feel sorry for someone and try to help them

When one door closes…

Can you complete this famous English expression? It means when we lose a chance to do something, a chance to do something else appears.

“When one door closes….”

a) another one closes too

b) another one opens

c) we can’t leave the room

d) we go home

The answer is below!

building metal house architecture

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Answer: b) another one opens

“When one door closes, another one opens”

A cloud on the horizon

Do you know the phrase “a cloud on the horizon“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Pauline: Are you looking forward to your vacation?

Jean: Yes, but there is a cloud on the horizon.

Pauline: What’s that?

Jean: I have to go into hospital when I come back.

Does it mean:

a) an exciting time

b) the weather is cloudy

c) something good that will happen in the future

d) something bad that will happen in the future

The answer is below!↓

green grass field during sunset

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Answer: d) something bad that will happen in the future

Weary of (something)

Do you know the English expression “to be weary of (something)“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Kate: Why did you stop going out with your friends on Friday nights?

Marcy: I grew weary of it. We went to the same place every week and talked about the same things.

Does it mean:

a) interested in something

b) feel sleepy

c) feel old

d) bored with something

The answer is below!↓

women holding shot glasses

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Answer: d) bored with something

Embark on (something)

Do you know the English phrase “to embark on (something)“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Evelyn: Do you know anything about this singer?

Greg: I know that she worked in finance before she embarked on a career in music.

Does it mean:

a) to fail at something

b) to start something new and exciting

c) to start something boring

d) to do something reluctantly

The answer is below! ↓

black microphone

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Answer: b) to start something new and exciting

Fall out with (someone)

Do you know the phrase “to fall out with (someone)“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Karen: Why aren’t you talking to your brother?

Tom: I fell out with him last week. He said bad things about my friend.

Does it mean:

a) move away from someone

b) have an argument and stop being friendly with someone

c) have an argument and make friends with someone

d) hit someone

The answer is below! ↓

 

backlit blur boys brother

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Answer: b) have an argument and stop being friendly with someone