Go back to the drawing board

Do you know the English expression “to go back to the drawing board“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Eddie: How is the marketing project going?

Robert: Terrible. We will have to go back to the drawing board.

Eddie: That’s too bad. We spent a lot of money on it.

Does it mean

a) go and draw something

b) buy some drawing boards

c) start something again because it failed

d) make a new plan on a drawing board

The answer is below! ↓

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard

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Answer: c) start something again because it failed

Bite (one’s) tongue

Do you know the English expression “to bite (one’s) tongue“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Sara: The boss gave us the wrong sales data in the meeting.

Mandy: Did you tell her?

Sara: No, she was in a bad mood so I bit my tongue.

Does it mean:

a) physically bite one’s tongue

b) laugh

c) lie

d) not say anything

The answer is below!↓

nature lion south africa whitelion

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Answer: d) not say anything

Pull the wool over (someone’s) eyes

Do you know the English expression “to pull the wool over (someone’s) eyes“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Sandra: My son told me that he had done all his summer homework, but his teacher called me today and said that he hadn’t done anything!

Anna: I don’t think he expected the teacher to call you. He thought he could pull the wool over your eyes!

Does it mean:

a) put wool in someone’s eyes

b) blind someone

c) do something when the other person isn’t looking

d) deceive someone

The answer is below!↓

gray yarn ball

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Answer: d) deceive someone

In a huff

Do you know the English phrase “to be in a huff“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Teresa: What’s wrong with John?

Olive: He’s in a huff because the boss won’t let him take a week off work next month.

Does it mean:

a) happy

b) sad

c) miserable

d) annoyed

The answer is below!↓

blank business composition computer

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Answer: d) annoyed

Think on (one’s) feet

Do you know the English expression “to think on (one’s) feet“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Edwin: Who is going to do the presentation at the conference?

Paul: Sue is going to do it. We think some people will ask difficult questions. Sue is good at thinking on her feet.

Does it mean:

a) think about (one’s) feet

b) think standing up

c) make fast decisions

d) make good decisions

The answer is below!↓

 

Answer: c) make fast decisions

 

Easier said than done!

Do you know the English expression “easier said than done“? Read the conversation below.  Can you guess the meaning?

Harry: Let’s take a month off work in August and go travelling!

Louise: That’s easier said than done! I don’t think my boss will let me take so long off.

Does it mean:

a) easy to say, but difficult to do

b) easy to do

c) easy to say and do

d) difficult to say and do

The answer is below!

 

Answer: a) easy to say, but difficult to do

Lose sleep over (something)

Do you know the English expression “to lose sleep over (something)“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Harry: My daughter has started spending all her spare time in her room on her computer. What do you think?

Rachel: It sounds like normal teenager behaviour. I wouldn’t lose sleep over it if I were you.

Does it mean:

a) don’t sleep

b) worry about something

c) stay awake

d) wait for something

The answer is below!↓

 

Answer: b) worry about something