As clear as mud

Do you know the English expression “to be as clear as mud“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Steph: What did you think of John’s presentation? Did you understand it?

Liam: It was as clear as mud. I don’t know why the boss always picks him to do presentations. He can’t make one that is easy to undertstand.

Does it mean:

a) very easy to understand

b) fairly easy to understand

c) very difficult to understand

d) very interesting

The answer is below! ↓

withered ground

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Answer: c) very difficult to understand

By the book

Do you know the English expression “by the book?” Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Angela: I heard that Graham did the accounts. Do you think the accounts will be OK?

Nina: They’ll be fine. Don’t worry. Graham always does things by the book.

Does it mean:

a) according to the rules

b) lazily

c) while reading

d) next to a book

The answer is below!↓

blurred book book pages literature

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Answer: a) according to the rules

At a snail’s pace

Do you know the idiom “at a snail’s pace“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Oliver: Hasn’t Peter finished the report yet?

Leah: No, he’s still working on it.

Oliver: Why does he take so long? He works at a snail’s pace!

Does it mean:

a) very quickly

b) very well

c) very slowly

d) in an annoying way

The answer is below!↓

white black and brown snail on green leaf

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Answer: c) very slowly

Water under the……

Can you complete this English expression? It means someone had a problem in the past, but now, they don’t worry about it because time has passed and it cannot be changed.

Water under the …….

a) well

b) ocean

c) bridge

d) road

The answer is below! ↓

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Answer: c) bridge

Eg: Matt and I had a fight a few years ago, but that’s all water under the bridge. We are friends now.

Spur (someone) on

Do you know the English expression “to spur (someone) on“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Robin: What spurred you on to build your business?

Bella: Having children spurred me on. I want to give them a good future.

Does it mean:

a) encourage someone

b) discourage someone

c) annoy someone

d) doubt someone

The answer is below!↓

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Answer: a) encourage someone

Give (someone) a lift

Do you know the English expression “to give (someone) a lift“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Wanda: How are you getting to the station?

John: I’m going to walk.

Wanda: I can give you a lift if you want.

John: That would be great, thanks.

Does it mean:

a) take someone somewhere by car

b) take someone somewhere by elevator

c) carry someone somwhere

d) call a taxi for someone

The answer is below! ↓

crowd on the subway

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Answer: a) take someone somewhere by car

Get your skates on!

Do you know the English expression “get your skates on“? It is used in the UK, and it is an informal expression. Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Belinda: Aren’t you ready yet? Get your skates on, or we will be late!

Paul: I’ll be ready in five minutes!

Does it mean:

a) put your skating boots on

b) hurry up

c) stop getting ready

d) leave the house now

The answer is below!↓

red vintage shoes sport

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Answer: b) hurry up