Down in the dumps

Do you know the English expression “to be down in the dumps“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Peter: How did your son feel when his football team lost the match?

Ted: He was down in the dumps for a few days, but he’s OK now.

Does it mean:

a) in an angry mood

b) in a sad mood

c) confused

d) frightened

The answer is below!↓

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Answer: b) in a sad mood

Behind closed doors

Do you know the English expression “behind closed doors“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Wendy: Did you go to the meeting yesterday?

Catherine: No. No one from my office did. It was held behind closed doors.

Does it mean:

a) in a small office

b) in public

c) with the door closed

d) done in secret

The answer is below!↓

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Answer: d) done in secret

Around the clock

Do you know the English expression “around the clock“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Ian: How are things at your company?

Evelyn: Tough. We are working around the clock to get a big project finished.

Does it mean:

a) all day and all night

b) sitting around a clock

c) behind schedule

d) ahead of schedule

The answer is below!↓

pexels-photo-707582.jpeg

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Answer: a) all day and all night

In tears

Do you know the English expression “to be in tears“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Sally: How did everyone react when they heard they were losing their jobs?

Neil: Most of them were in tears. It was a big shock for everyone.

Does it mean:

a) angry

b) shouting

c) crying

d) shocked

The answer is below!↓

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Answer: c) crying

Neck and neck

Do you know the English expression “to be neck and neck“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Karl: Who leads your industry?

Bruce: Our two rivals are neck and neck. We are just behind.

Does it mean:

a) fighting

b) level

c) at the front

d) large

The answer is below! ↓

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Answer: b) level

 

Beg to differ

Do you know the English expression “beg to differ“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Tina: I think we should spend more money on this housing project.

Rita: I beg to differ. We have spent enough already.

Does it mean:

a) disagree

b) agree

c) ask for money

d) get angry

The answer is below!↓

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Answer: a) disagree

Bemused

Do you know the English adjective “bemused“? Read the conversation below. Can you guess the meaning?

Annette: How did everyone react to Tony’s presentation?

Frank: When he finished, everyone gave him a bemused look. No one knew what he was talking about.

Does it mean:

a) irritated

b) amused

c) terrified

d) confused

The answer is below!↓

laptop on table

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Answer: d) confused